Sambuca baci

P1170077I tried it from Nigella’s recipe, as she said almost as light as butterfly kissed on flower. These almost like doughnuts but made of scented, sweet air. Italian called it kisses (baci)

Believed me your first bite of these will definitely wanting more. Beside it is easy to make too. I don’t think you can resist to eat them once is come out from the frying pan.

Here is how I started, you will need one egg, 100g of ricotta mix both in a large bowl, beat it together until smooth. Then you adding in 40g plain flour, 1 teaspoon of baking powder, 2 teaspoons sambuca liqueur if you don’t have sambuca, you could used lemon or orange juice, 1 teaspoon of sugar, 1 teaspoon grated orange zest. Beat the mixture again to make a smooth batter.

Pour about 2cm vegetable oil or any flavourless oil into a frying pan, and heat until a small piece of bread sizzles when you drop it into the pan and browns in about 40 seconds (the temperature should be at about 180ºC). And keep your eye on the pan at all times.

Oil a teaspoon measure and gently drop rounded teaspoons of the ricotta batter into the pan; about 4 at a time is much manageable.

The little baci will puff up slightly and turn golden underneath, if you lucky enough you will see the baci will turn itself around to get the sun tan. Otherwise you could flip them over carefully with an implement of your choice, to colour the other side as well. Watch out that the oil doesn’t get too hot: turn the heat down if they are browning too quickly.

Once they are golden all over, lift them out with a slotted spoon and place them over plate lined with 2 sheets of kitchen paper, to get rid of any exceed oil. Carry on cooking until all the mixture is used up, then turn off the heat under the oil. Once the  baci have cooled a bit, push the icing sugar through a small sieve to dust them thickly.

If you are not eating them straightaway, pop the pre-sugared, cooked baci on the wire rack over a tin in 150ºC oven and keep them warm for up to 1 hour.

If so inclined, serve with a shot of sambuca or an espresso. I might make another batch for teatime. Yum!

Enhanced by Zemanta
Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Sambuca baci

  1. These pastries look like they turned out very well.This type of pastry is popular in Italy arounf the feast of St. Joseph in March. I bet they were delicious. Great way to use sambuca.

    1. Indeed by using sambuca for the extra flavour. Thank you for the information. I didn’t know it is meant for a feast in Italy, which part of Italy celebrate this feast?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s